Pre-inclusion Agreement with South Metro Fire – Is It Good For Littleton’s Citizens?

City Council will approve an Agreement to Move to South Metro Fire on Tuesday, April 17, 2018

 The Meeting is Your Last and Only Chance to be Heard before the Move to South Metro Fire Goes Final

 Tell Council You Want A Fair Deal

 Fire protection is a big deal for everyone and we all respect and appreciate the service fire fighters provide for the City of Littleton.  When Littleton’s fire partners, Highlands Ranch and the Littleton Fire Protection District, backed out of their Agreement with the City, the City explored other fire and emergency service options.  The result of its exploration is the Pre-Inclusion Agreement that will be considered at Tuesday’s April 17, 2018 council meeting. Continue reading

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City Council Study Session – 10 April 2018 (Kendig Keast, Homeless, Quasi-Judicial)

City Council Study Session                 10 April 2018.            Citizen Minutes

Pat Driscoll was absent
a)  ID# 18-124 Study session on community visioning process with Kendig Keast –

Vision to Comprehensive Plan – Preliminary Scope and Outline

Gary Mitchell and Meredith Dang from Kendig Keast talked about what they will do to help Littleton with the “visioning” to Complan and Code update. Continue reading

City Council Regular and Special Meeting 3 April 2018 – South Metro Fire

City Council Regular Meeting.      3 April 2018.        Citizen Minutes – Karina Elrod was absent

Citizen Comments

Linda Knufinkepresented a comparison of the cost between South Metro and Littleton Fire based on a cost per call.  She used the CAFR info from each organization to make her comparisons.  The data shows that South Metro’s cost per call is $5,857.29 and Littleton’s cost per call is $1,777.47.  Continue reading

City Council Study Session 27 March 2018 – Legislative Rules and Nex Gen Advisory Group

City Council Study Session.       27 March 2018             Citizen Minutes

 ID# 18-113 – Updates to council protocols and/or legislative procedures

Kathy Novak talked to the council about how to build a relationship. She asked the council to write down their expectations of council.

Jerry Valdes – be prepared – read and understand the package of material for each meeting. Ask questions.

Continue reading

City Council Regular Meeting 20 March 2018 – Wildlife Ordinance

City Council Regular Meeting            20 March 2018                   Citizen Minutes

Public Comment

John Watson thanked council for the formation of the Columbine Square Advisory Group. He spoke to what he believes to be an inadequacy in Littleton’s impact fees. He compared Littleton’s impact fees to Brighton, Colorado Springs, Boulder, and Aurora. Littleton’s total impact fees are $3,697 as compared to Longmont’s $13,000, Boulder’s $8,500 and Colorado Springs’ $6,000 to $7,000. He said he has a deaf ear when he hears the need for road improvements when we need to collect more in impact fees. Continue reading

Want to Know How Much More You Will Pay For Fire with South Metro

City Council directed staff to negotiate for Littleton to be included within the South Metro Fire District.  This will cause Littleton residents to pay more for fire and EMS protection than we are currently paying.  Below are some “calculators” that you can use to see what difference it will make on your property tax liability.  Just plug in your number into the blue box and the new rate will appear.  Make sure you use the correct chart – there are two – residential and commercial.

Residential v2

Commercial Assessment

We do not know how much the unification will cost us and won’t until the council votes.  Once the council votes the question will have to go to the taxpayers as this will be a tax increase under TABOR.

At the 3 February workshop, city council did discuss the possibility of reducing our current 6.662 mill levy to 2 mills creating a credit to offset some of the extra charge of going to South Metro.  Currently, we pay approximately $7,100,000 – crediting back some of that cost through a mill levy reduction equivalent to $4,000,000 in the form of a credit would leave $3,100,000 on the table for council to spend.  They also talked about earmarking their $3,100,000 in “savings” to be spent on street maintenance.*  If council decides they want to reduce our mill levy to help us pay for the increase in fire protection just how much they are willing to reduce it remains to be seen.  Who knows, maybe they will decide to credit the taxpayers 100% for what we are currently providing in taxes to pay for fire protection.  It is a policy question that council will decide.

 

*Not sure this can be done – council mandating how future council’s appropriate funds.  Apparently the city attorney has a way around this difficulty.

Council Workshop – 3 February 2018

Council Workshop             3 February 2018            Citizen Minutes

The meeting opened with remarks from Debbie Brinkman. There’s a perception that we are not open. Leadership drives the conversation and it becomes a very narrow conversation. We need to have a process for communication – when you have polarity you become myopic and fail to see the big picture. For instance on fire – has it been decided or is there a need for a broader conversation.

Each council member was asked to provide an expectation of the workshop Continue reading